Five percent of Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes Degraded/Fragmented in 13 years

See our post at Global Forest Watch based on our recent IFL update:

http://blog.globalforestwatch.org/2016/08/partner-post-five-percent-of-c...

 

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A Fresh Look at Canada's Virgin Forests

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Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes 2000-2013: Interactive Map

(2016-07-05) Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) is pleased to release its first interactive map: Intact Forest Landscapes of Canada, 2000-2013. This map helps democratize data by enabling viewers to view GFWC's intact forest landscapes as of 2000 and 2013 and the areas of degradation and fragmentation.

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Decrease in Canada’s large intact forest landscapes between 2000 and 2013

(2016-07-05) Global Forest Watch Canada has just released its newest iteration of Canada’s intact forest landscapes layer, noting a significant decrease in their area. Intact forest landscapes are becoming increasingly rare at the global level. They are also growing in importance as reference points for understanding managed forest landscapes and designing management schemes that preserve or restore significant aspects of the natural forest landscape.

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Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes 2013 Dataset

(2016-07-05) GFWC has updated its circa 2000 intact forest landscape (IFL) layer and created a 2013 version. GFWC, as per its core principles, is sharing all three datasets: updated circa 2000 IFL layer, 2013 IFL layer, and the IFL change 2000-2013 layer.  See the metadata plus the bulletin for further details on the methodology and results.

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Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes Updated to 2013 Bulletin

(2016-07-05) Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) are the last remaining areas of forest and non-forest ecosystems that are at least 500 km2 in size and untouched by roads or other significant human activity. Canada, together with Russia and Brazil, contain 65% of all the world’s IFLs. But these pristine forests are becoming increasingly disturbed, and research shows that even without deforestation this degradation and fragmentation is enough to threaten biodiversity around the world. Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) has recently updated its IFL data to 2013, using the best available data, including Landsat satellite imagery and Environment Canada disturbance data.

GFWC found that:

  • Almost 5% (216,199 km2) of Canada’s IFLs were degraded or fragmented by human activity between 2000 and 2013. IFLs covered 4.5 million km2 of Canada in 2000 compared to 4.3 million km2 in 2013.
  • Four provinces—Quebec, Alberta, Ontario, and British Columbia—accounted for 71% of the 216,199 kmof human disturbances. 
  • 11.7% (just over 500,000 km2) of IFLs were located within forestry tenures as of 2013.
  • 25.5% of Canada’s forestry tenures were covered by IFLs in 2013.
  • 17.5% (750,851 km2) of 2013 IFLs were located within interim and permanent protected areas. 

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Gorillas in the Rainforests of Central Africa

At GFWC, we focus on Canadian forests. But before being E.D. of GFWC, I spent many years working in tropical rainforests as well. During 2004, I had the privilege to see western lowland gorillas in their natural habitat.

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Summer 2016 Job Postings

(2016-05-31) Global Forest Watch Canada is seeking to fill two summer GIS Developer Technician positions at our Ottawa office for a period of eight weeks beginning mid-June. Job description and details are available here. Funding for these positions is through the Canada Summer Jobs Program. As such, applicants must be returning full time post-secondary students. Thank-you for your interest.

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Exciting Plans for GFWC in 2016

My first year as Executive Director of Global Forest Watch Canada (GWFC) was a very busy and exhilarating year (it was so busy that I am only writing this in month 14). Taking over an organisation requires lots of learning, as I discovered throughout the course of 2015, and it can be exhausting too. After taking time to get to know the organization, its strengths and limitations, I have begun to make many changes, including moving our office to Ottawa. There are many more changes ahead in 2016 as we must move with the times and the advent of new technologies and big data.

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Oil and gas fragmentation in Northwest Saskatchewan (VIDEO & PHOTOS)

(2016-01-21) In October 2015, GFWC staff did some field work in northeastern AB and northwest SK to verify our mapping work. The aerial video and photos posted here show oil and gas fragmentation in former intact forest landscapes.  

 

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