Pipeline Infrastructure Bulletin: Numbers and Datasets Inconsistent and Incomplete

(2017-07-25)  Canada is a significant energy producer, with oil and gas accounting for approximately 7.3 percent of Canada’s GDP. In recent years, the construction of oil and gas pipelines has been particularly controversial for a variety of reasons including the risk of spills, wider concerns about climate change and other environmental impacts of fossil fuels, as well as increasing recognition of aboriginal rights and title to the land that pipelines cross. Global Forest Watch Canada examined the extent of the pipeline network in Canada and collected geospatial datasets of pipelines to assess whether the datasets qualify as open data and how comprehensive they appear to be. What we found was surprising.

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Public Lands, Public Geospatial Data: Some Jurisdictions Lag Behind

(2017-05-30) Many governments in Canada have committed to open government, and open data. However, these commitments have not yet resulted in comprehensive availability of open geospatial datasets on how governments allocate public lands and sub-surface resources. An analysis conducted by Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) found that not all provinces and territories have publicly available open datasets on forestry, mineral, and petroleum/natural gas concessions.

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Report: Open Data Assessment of Geospatial Concession Datasets in Canada

(2017-05-30) Approximately 89% of Canada’s surface lands are public lands and the Crown also owns most sub-surface resources. In an era of open government and open data, Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) decided to assess whether Canadian federal, provincial and territorial government geospatial datasets of natural resource concessions are “open data.” We compiled and assessed the status of geospatial datasets for forestry, mining, and petroleum/natural gas concessions against the Open Data definition, which requires data be free to access, use, modify, and share. In this report, GFWC outlines the findings of our assessment.

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Canada's Industrial Concessions 2016 (Multiple Datasets)

(2017-02-21) GFWC has recently completed updating our industrial concessions datasets, current to the end of 2016. Industrial concessions are agreements between companies and governments that allow for the exploration and/or exploitation of renewable and non-renewable natural resources and as such are an important indicator of the present geographic extent of industrial interest and potential resource development on the Canadian landscape. Our current datasets include: forestry concessions, mineral concessions, and petroleum/natural gas concessions. Note: GFWC is in the process of preparing an open data assessment on these latest geospatial datasets that will be sent out for review and published when finalized.

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Measuring Comprehensive Wealth in Canada

(2017-02-02) In December 2016, the International Institute for Sustainable Development released a report entitled "Comprehensive Wealth in Canada - Measuring What Matters in the Long Run." Global Forest Watch Canada is pleased to have provided input into this report through geospatial analysis of ecosystems and ecosytem quality, as one of the metrics that should be measured. The report and further details on the subject can be found at: http://www.iisd.org/comprehensivewealth/en/.

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Journey of a Lifetime: Homeward Bound to Antarctica 2016

(2016-12-01) Nearly two years ago, on a cold and snowy January morning, I stood on the balcony of my condo in downtown Ottawa, Canada, making a two-minute video. Why? I was making an impassioned “balcony pitch” setting out the reasons I wanted to be a participant in the inaugural round of Homeward Bound, a 10-year groundbreaking leadership, strategic and science initiative for women, set against the backdrop of Antarctica.

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Broadback River Watershed and adjacent area: Interactive Map

(2016-10-20) Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) is pleased to release an interactive map of the results of our analyses of Landsat satellite imagery to map anthropogenic (human) disturbance from 1980-2015 in the Broadback River watershed and adjacent area to the south and east. Results show a steady increase in the presence of industrial activities, especially related to the forest industry and the roads required to undertake logging.

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Expanding Human Disturbance Footprint in Quebec's Broadback River Watershed

(2016-10-20) Mapping analyses from satellite images shows that the Broadback River watershed, and the boreal forest to the south and east of it, experienced a significant expansion of human development between 1980 and 2015. The analyses, conducted by Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC), examined the length of linear and area-based disturbances in the Broadback River watershed.

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Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Broadback River Watershed, Quebec (1980-2015)

 (2016-10-20) These datasets show the extent of anthropogenic disturbances mapped by GFWC in the Broadback River Watershed region based on Landsat imagery from 1980 to 2015. Three datasets are available for download: (1) linear disturbances; (2) polygonal disturbances; and (3) a dataset in which the linear and polygonal disturbance datasets were buffered by 500m to account for an ecological footprint and combined. The disturbance data in all three datasets is separated into 5-year time periods, from 1980 to 2015. 

 
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Bulletin: Time Series Analyses of Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Broadback River Watershed, Quebec

(2016-10-20) This bulletin presents the results of time series analyses of anthropogenic industrial disturbance in the Broadback River watershed in Quebec, as well as an area to the south and east. The results reveal a steady increase in both linear and area-based disturbances. Logging and associated road development are the most significant contributors to the cumulative growth of human impacts; however, there are still opportunities to ensure that further development is minimized in the watershed.

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