Canada's forests are online!

Welcome to GFWC's new website! We hope that you like our new look, and more importantly, that you find that this new site provides a better way to access our materials. Use the links in the sidebar to sign up for our newsletter, and to follow us on Twitter and Google+, where we will do our best to keep you updated, and where we plan to share additional maps and photos.

Be sure to also check out the new international Global Forest Watch website at: www.globalforestwatch.org!

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The State of Alberta’s Forests - With A Focus on the Eastern Slopes

(2014-06-26) New Global Forest Watch satellite data reveals extensive forest loss in Alberta’s Eastern Slopes during the period 2000-2012. 6.8% of the forests in the Eastern Slopes were lost between 2000 and 2013 due to industrialization. This amount of loss is more than double that of the average throughout Canada’s forests and is also significantly greater than in Alberta’s tar sands region.

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Putting People on the Map: the Land Tenure Data Challenge and Global Forest Watch (GFW Blog Post)

(10-04-2014) "By incorporating land tenure information, Global Forest Watch will be among the first global tools that enable stakeholders to better understand who to hold accountable for forest loss, and who to recognize and reward for forest protection. However, collecting geospatial data on local land rights is challenging for several reasons." Read the GFW blog post here.

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5 Overlooked Deforestation Hotspots: Boreal Forests Are Cleared for Tar Sands Development (GFW Blog Post)

(21-03-2014) The World Resources Institute’s new Global Forest Watch initiative identifies 5 overlooked deforestation hotspots, one which is Canada's Tar Sands region. It includes an animation sequence of a portion of the tar sands region that shows forest loss annually from 2000 to 2012. The other forest global hotspots are in Paraguay, Malaysia, Ivory Coast, and the Atlanta suburbs in the United States. Click here to read the blog post.

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Industrial Concessions Cover Over One Quarter of Canada

(2014-02-27) “Concessions show the locations where companies consider resources to have an economic value. Now we have a national portrait of where these interests are across Canada,” said Ryan Cheng, lead author of the bulletin. “Granting industrial concessions can result in conflicting land uses when there are different visions for a landscape.”

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Canada's Industrial Concessions: A Spatial Analysis

(2014-02-27) Global Forest Watch Canada's new look at industrial concessions across Canada, including national datasets, maps and analyses on their distribution and extent. This bulletin looks at the coverage of industrial concessions across multiple jurisdictions, and compares their extent with protected areas and the area of anthropogenic disturbance.

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Canada's Industrial Concessions 2013 (Multiple Datasets)

(2014-02-27) Industrial concessions are agreements between companies and governments that allow for the exploration and/or exploitation of renewable and non-renewable natural resources. They are an important indicator of the present geographic extent of industrial interest and potential resource development on the Canadian landscape.

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Global Forest Watch: Dynamic New Platform to Protect Forests Worldwide

(2014-02-20) The World Resources Institute (WRI), Google, and a group of more than 40 partners, including Global Forest Watch Canada, launched Global Forest Watch (GFW), a dynamic online forest monitoring and alert system that empowers people everywhere to better manage forests.

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Investigation into CNRL's uncontrolled releases of crude bitumen in the Primrose area of Alberta reveals failures to protect the public interest

(2014-02-06) Peter Lee, executive director of Global Forest Watch Canada and co-investigator, notes that the evidence gathered documents inadequate provision of timely information to the public, both on the part of the Alberta Energy Regulator and CNRL. He adds, “Both the Alberta Energy Regulator and CNRL have been slow to provide information and the information provided has been sparse and frequently inaccurate.”

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CNRL's Persistent 2013-2014 Bitumen Releases near Cold Lake, Alberta: Facts, Unanswered Questions, and Implications

(2014-02-06) Dr. Kevin Timoney (Treeline Ecological Research) and Peter Lee (Global Forest Watch Canada) provide an independent investigation of ongoing bitumen releases at Canadian Natural Resources Limited Primrose operations near Cold Lake, Alberta. They find that there are significant problems related to Canadian Natural Resources Limited and the Alberta Energy Regulator failing to inform the public and failing to adequately address operational problems.

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