boreal forest

Tar Sands Threaten World’s Largest Boreal Forest (GFW Blog Post)

(2014-07-15)  "Canada’s boreal forest is one of Earth’s major ecological treasures. Yet the region’s forests are under threat from logging, hydrodams and mining. Satellite data reveals a major new threat to Canada’s boreal forests—tar sands development." Read the GFW blog post here.
 
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5 Overlooked Deforestation Hotspots: Boreal Forests Are Cleared for Tar Sands Development (GFW Blog Post)

(21-03-2014) The World Resources Institute’s new Global Forest Watch initiative identifies 5 overlooked deforestation hotspots, one which is Canada's Tar Sands region. It includes an animation sequence of a portion of the tar sands region that shows forest loss annually from 2000 to 2012. The other forest global hotspots are in Paraguay, Malaysia, Ivory Coast, and the Atlanta suburbs in the United States. Click here to read the blog post.

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Canada's Industrial Concessions 2013 (Multiple Datasets)

(2014-02-27) Industrial concessions are agreements between companies and governments that allow for the exploration and/or exploitation of renewable and non-renewable natural resources. They are an important indicator of the present geographic extent of industrial interest and potential resource development on the Canadian landscape.

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Industrial developments threatening Canada's woodland caribou

Caribou(2012-01-10) Global Forest Watch Canada publishes new study confirming Environment Canada's “secret” concerns regarding threatened species in Alberta's oil sands region.

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Canada’s woodland caribou: Industrial disturbances in their ranges and implications for their survival

(2012-01-10) This bulletin contains evidence of the extent to which industrial developments are threatening woodland caribou (boreal population) in Canada's jurisdictions, especially in Alberta's oil sands region. This bulletin is part of a series by Global Forest Watch Canada to address the geographic distribution and key environmental impacts of Canada's energy sectors.

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Conservation-type areas in the Draft Lower Athabasca Regional Plan, Alberta: Implications for whooping crane and woodland caribou

(2011-09-22) The Alberta Government's recently announced Draft Lower Athabasca Regional Plan 2011-2021 allocates much more area to oil sands leases than to conservation areas for whooping cranes and woodland caribou, according to this Global Forest Watch Canada report.

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A Forest of Blue: Canada's Boreal Forest, the World's Waterkeeper

(2011-03-18) A first of its kind report published by the Pew Environment Group and co-authored by GFWC's Peter Lee and Ryan Cheng reveals that Canada's boreal, the world's largest intact forest and on-land carbon storehouse, contains more unfrozen freshwater than any other ecosystem. As United Nations' International Year of Forests and World Water Day coincide, world leaders are grappling with water scarcity and pollution - and scientists are calling boreal protection a top global priority.

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Castle Area Forest Land Use Zone: Linear Disturbances, Access Densities and Grizzly Bear Habitat Security Areas

(2011-03-09) This report examines linear disturbances in the Castle Area Forest Land Use Zone of southwestern Alberta and analyzes these disturbances for: their use by motorized vehicles; the Government of Alberta's management and policy intentions compared to actual use by motorized vehicles, and; their potential impact on key grizzly bear areas.

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Ecological Values within Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes

(2010-12-17) This dataset combines key ecological values within intact forest landscapes in order to identify what can be called “key ecological areas”—that is, the most valuable areas from an ecological perspective.

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Atlas of Key Ecological Areas Within Canada’s Intact Forest Landscapes

(2010-12-17) Global Forest Watch Canada has created a dataset of key ecological areas by applying a ranking system to a variety of biotic and abiotic datasets of the terrestrial and aquatic environments within Canada’s intact forest landscapes. The results are an interesting illustration of a combined analytical and mapping approach to ecological values.

 

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