boreal forest

Industrial-caused Changes to Canada’s Forest Frontier: 1990–2001

(2010-12-10) Global Forest Watch Canada compiles and summarizes several change analysis projects, which examine an average 11-year period (1990–2001). These projects combine to cover 2.9 million square kilometres throughout Canada’s forest landscapes. The maps and data GFWC are releasing highlight that although Canada contains globally significant intact boreal and temperate forest landscapes, the forest frontier is undergoing rapid and recent massive human-caused transformations. These transformations are mainly a result of industrial activities. Thus, Canada has both opportunities and challenges in terms of sustainably managing its remaining forest resource for a range of resource consumption and ecological values.

Menu categories: 

Anthropogenic Changes to Canada’s Forest Frontier: 1990–2001

(2010-12-10) This dataset combines seven GFWC anthropogenic change datasets (four previously published and three unpublished) to create a dataset with a similar methodology and time period for a large portion of Canada’s forest landscapes.

Menu categories: 

Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes

(2010-09-13) This dataset was created as part of GFWC’s project “Where Is the Best of What’s Left?” The purpose was to map all of Canada’s remaining intact forest landscape fragments larger than 5,000 hectares for the boreal and taiga ecozones, and larger than 1,000 hectares for the temperate ecozones. This dataset is a revision and update of a previous dataset created for the GFWC report Canada’s

Menu categories: 

Canada Access: Combined

(2010-09-13) The Canada Access dataset is a compilation of data sources showing areas of Canada that have undergone anthropogenic disturbance.

Menu categories: 

Cumulative Access in Canada's Forest Ecozones (bulletin)

(2010-09-13) This Global Forest Watch Canada study has analyzed the extent to which Canada's forest ecozones have been impacted by significant human activities. GFWC's cumulative access layer was compiled by analyzing Landsat (TM and ETM) satellite images for the period 1988 to 2006. All visible infrastructure and other human activities on the images were mapped and buffered by 500 metres. It is accompanied by a geospatial dataset (see link under "Related Stories" below). 

Menu categories: 

Comprehensive conservation planning in Canadian boreal regions

(2010-05-10) Published in the scientific journal Biological Conservation (authors: DW Schindler and PG Lee). In a water-scarce world, there is increasing pressure to divert and exploit boreal freshwaters, and devising conservation plans to protect boreal freshwaters and their catchments is urgent. We propose a catchment-based approach that includes water and chemical mass-balances as a sensitive means of detecting early degradation of many ecosystem services in both catchments and freshwaters.

Menu categories: 

Does the Alberta Tar Sands Industry Pollute? The Scientific Evidence

(2009-10-22) This research paper determines whether physical and ecological changes that result from tar sands industrial activities are detectable. The findings conclude that: present levels of some contaminants pose an ecosystem or human health risk, the effects of which deserve immediate and systematic study; projected tripling of tar sands activities over the next decade may result in unacceptably large and unforeseen impacts to biodiversity, ecosystem function, and public health, and; the attention of the world's scientific community is urgently needed. As published in The Open Conservation Biology Journal, 2009, 3, 65-81.

Menu categories: 

Bitumen and Biocarbon: Land Use Conversions and Loss of Biological Carbon Due to Bitumen Operations in the Boreal Forests of Alberta, Canada

(2009-09-27) A report that provides estimates of land use changes, biological carbon content and consequent potential greenhouse emissions due to existing and future surface mining and in situ extraction of bitumen in Alberta, Canada. The paper reveals that significant amounts of greenhouse gases are emitted through the disturbance and/or removal of biocarbon (trees, shrubs, peats), which overlay Alberta's oil sands. These emissions have not previously been measured nor reported by governments and industry.

Menu categories: 

The Last Great Intact Forest Landscapes of Canada: Atlas of Alberta (Parts I & II)

(2009-04-02) This 2-part atlas was published in the hope that it will assist Albertans in their efforts to sustainably manage their important forest legacy; its production was triggered by the Alberta Government's release of Alberta's Land-use Framework in December 2008. The atlas reveals a dramatic reduction in large blocks of Alberta's natural boreal forest landscapes due to the expansion of industrial activities in recent decades. Part I of the atlas provides context and maps of Alberta's intact forest landscapes; Part II focuses on the threats to these forests.

Menu categories: 

Urban Sprawl and Other Major Land Use Conversions in Ontario's Greenbelt From 1993 to 2007: A Change Analysis Project Using Satellite Imagery

(2008-07-02) The Ontario Greenbelt presents both opportunities and challenges for managing growth and retaining natural areas and key agricultural production lands. This report contributed to a larger project (by the David Suzuki Foundation and the Greenbelt foundation) around analyzing key ecosystem values in Ontario's Greenbelt.

Menu categories: 

Pages