change analysis

Broadback River Watershed and adjacent area: Interactive Map

(2016-10-20) Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) is pleased to release an interactive map of the results of our analyses of Landsat satellite imagery to map anthropogenic (human) disturbance from 1980-2015 in the Broadback River watershed and adjacent area to the south and east. Results show a steady increase in the presence of industrial activities, especially related to the forest industry and the roads required to undertake logging.

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Expanding Human Disturbance Footprint in Quebec's Broadback River Watershed

(2016-10-20) Mapping analyses from satellite images shows that the Broadback River watershed, and the boreal forest to the south and east of it, experienced a significant expansion of human development between 1980 and 2015. The analyses, conducted by Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC), examined the length of linear and area-based disturbances in the Broadback River watershed.

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Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Broadback River Watershed, Quebec (1980-2015)

 (2016-10-20) These datasets show the extent of anthropogenic disturbances mapped by GFWC in the Broadback River Watershed region based on Landsat imagery from 1980 to 2015. Three datasets are available for download: (1) linear disturbances; (2) polygonal disturbances; and (3) a dataset in which the linear and polygonal disturbance datasets were buffered by 500m to account for an ecological footprint and combined. The disturbance data in all three datasets is separated into 5-year time periods, from 1980 to 2015. 

 
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Bulletin: Time Series Analyses of Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Broadback River Watershed, Quebec

(2016-10-20) This bulletin presents the results of time series analyses of anthropogenic industrial disturbance in the Broadback River watershed in Quebec, as well as an area to the south and east. The results reveal a steady increase in both linear and area-based disturbances. Logging and associated road development are the most significant contributors to the cumulative growth of human impacts; however, there are still opportunities to ensure that further development is minimized in the watershed.

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Forest change in Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest compared to its broader ecoregion in British Columbia

(2015/03/16) The Great Bear Rainforest is the name coined by environmental groups in the mid-1990s to refer to this remote region of temperate rain forest on the British Columbia Coast between Vancouver Island and Southeast Alaska. It is one of the largest remaining tracts of unspoiled temperate coastal rainforest left in the world. The Great Bear Rainforest is the subject of our most recent "hotspot" analysis using the new, high-resolution Hansen forest change dataset. See the summary on the international GFW website: http://www.globalforestwatch.org/stories/185

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Rates of Forest change in the Northern Appalachian/Acadian region of North America

(2015-03-11) The latest in our forest “hotspot” monitoring analyses using the new, high resolution Hansen forest change global dataset. The Northern Appalachian/Acadian region (see map) is a critically important ecological area in North America and recent studies have demonstrated that it is a region with tremendous opportunities for achieving large conservation goals. Follow this link to the summary of our analysis on the international GFW website: http://www.globalforestwatch.org/stories/180

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Canada’s Boreal icon at risk

(2014-12-11) Woodland caribou are in trouble throughout their range in Canada. “Thanks to new high-resolution global satellite data developed by Dr. Matthew Hansen at the University of Maryland, we can systematically and accurately determine the rate of forest change across all the range of Canada’s woodland caribou and pinpoint exactly where in the boreal forest these animals are most under threat.” 

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Canada’s Boreal icon at risk: a ranking of the most threatened herd ranges of woodland caribou

(2014-12-11) Woodland caribou numbers are dropping because of habitat loss and high levels of predation by wolves, the result of vast changes in their herd ranges from a variety of development pressures. Now, thanks to a new study, we can for the first time systematically and accurately determine the rate of landscape change across all the range of woodland caribou and pin point where in the boreal forest these animals are most under threat. Our analysis clearly indicates the threat to boreal caribou is highest in Alberta.

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New satellite data analysis reveals areas of forest loss in the Y2Y Region

(2014-11-12) “The good news is that the entire area of Y2Y incurred a net forest loss of 2.4% during this period, an amount substantially less than for Canada as a whole,” said Peter Lee, Executive Director of Global Forest Watch Canada. “The bad news is that there are substantial regional differences between the North, Central and South zones of Y2Y, with the Central zone exhibiting significantly more net forest loss during the 2000 to 2012 period.”
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Forest Monitoring from Satellites in the Yellowstone to Yukon (Y2Y) Region

(2014-11-12) For the Y2Y region, Global Forest Watch Canada conducted a “first-look” analysis of forest extent and forest change, both loss and gain, for the period 2000-2012. We performed this analysis for three reasons: (1) to demonstrate the utility of powerful, new, freely-available satellite-based technologies; (2) to begin monitoring the key forest ecosystems of the Y2Y region, an area that is the focus of one of the planet's leading conservation initiatives; (3) to contribute to strategic discussions regarding where to focus conservation energies and resources for the forests of the Y2Y region.

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