land use planning

Canada's Industrial Concessions: A Spatial Analysis

(2014-02-27) Global Forest Watch Canada's new look at industrial concessions across Canada, including national datasets, maps and analyses on their distribution and extent. This bulletin looks at the coverage of industrial concessions across multiple jurisdictions, and compares their extent with protected areas and the area of anthropogenic disturbance.

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Canada's Industrial Concessions 2013 (Multiple Datasets)

(2014-02-27) Industrial concessions are agreements between companies and governments that allow for the exploration and/or exploitation of renewable and non-renewable natural resources. They are an important indicator of the present geographic extent of industrial interest and potential resource development on the Canadian landscape.

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Canada’s southern and western landscapes heavily fragmented

(2014-01-09) “We produced this mapping and analysis using a range of datasets, including satellite images, to map the extent of Canada’s  accessed and fragmented landscapes. The results show an overall steady increase in accessed and fragmented landscapes from the turn of the 21st century, especially in southern and western Canada.”

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Human Access of Canada’s Landscapes

 (2014-01-09)  Industrial and other human activity is fracturing Canada’s southern and western landscapes, according to this new bulletin (and accompanying dataset) by Global Forest Watch Canada. Summary information is provided for the amount of human access in each of Canada’s 13 jurisdictions and 15 ecozones.

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Canada Access 2010

(2014-01-09) Access is human-caused alteration of habitat and landscapes resulting in spatial separation of habitat and landscape units from a previous state of greater continuity. Major human access results in habitat fragmentation which is often a cause of species becoming threatened or endangered. This dataset provides an overall picture of the extent of human access in Canada.

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Passages from the Peace: Community Reflections on BC's Changing Peace Region

(2013-12-09) Industrial activity is fracturing Northeastern B.C. on a scale unparalleled in Canada, according to this report by Global Forest Watch Canada and the David Suzuki Foundation. The report gives voice to concerns raised by First Nations and farming communities about the alarming pace of industrial development in the Peace Region.

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Report voices community concerns over development in Peace Region

(2013-12-09) “Oil and gas development, logging, mines, large dams and other industrial infrastructure are having an alarming impact on natural areas and wildlife habitat in the booming Peace Region of northeastern British Columbia.”

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Global Forest Watch: Conserving Assets, Creating Legacies (Peter Lee at TEDx Nairobi)

(2013-11) GFWC's Executive Director talks about the Global Forest Watch (GFW) network: a partnership that aims to provide the most current, reliable, and actionable information about what is happening in forests worldwide. GFW unites satellite technology and human networks to show where and how forests are changing, who is using them, and how we can sustain them for future generations. View Peter's TEDx Talk on YouTube

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Economic benefits of Nova Scotia’s protected areas estimated at $1.3 to $4.2 billion annually. (Major study quantifies natural value of ecosystem services in Nova Scotia’s Protected Areas)

(2013-06-28) Nova Scotia’s existing and proposed protected areas provide natural benefits in the order of $1.3 to $4.2 billion a year, according to a study released by Global Forest Watch Canada. The report examines the extent of natural capital – the forest, lake, river, wetland and barren ecosystems – and for the first time estimates economic values for the natural benefits these ecosystems provide in Nova Scotia. 

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The Inclusive Wealth of Nova Scotia's Protected Areas: A Preliminary Estimate of Nature's Benefits

(2013-06-28) This study estimates the benefits provided by nature, such as filtering our air and water, combatting climate change by absorbing and storing carbon dioxide, and flood protection, for existing and proposed protected areas. 
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