MEDIA

Forest change in Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest compared to its broader ecoregion in British Columbia

(2015/03/16) The Great Bear Rainforest is the name coined by environmental groups in the mid-1990s to refer to this remote region of temperate rain forest on the British Columbia Coast between Vancouver Island and Southeast Alaska. It is one of the largest remaining tracts of unspoiled temperate coastal rainforest left in the world. The Great Bear Rainforest is the subject of our most recent "hotspot" analysis using the new, high-resolution Hansen forest change dataset. See the summary on the international GFW website: http://www.globalforestwatch.org/stories/185

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Rates of Forest change in the Northern Appalachian/Acadian region of North America

(2015-03-11) The latest in our forest “hotspot” monitoring analyses using the new, high resolution Hansen forest change global dataset. The Northern Appalachian/Acadian region (see map) is a critically important ecological area in North America and recent studies have demonstrated that it is a region with tremendous opportunities for achieving large conservation goals. Follow this link to the summary of our analysis on the international GFW website: http://www.globalforestwatch.org/stories/180

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Announcing GFWC's New Executive Director: Wynet Smith

(2015-01-05) Global Forest Watch Canada is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Wynet Smith as our new Executive Director. Peter Lee, the previous Executive Director, will continue to be involved with GFWC on a part-time basis for a time.
 
GFWC is excited to have Wynet, with her breadth and depth of experience, take over the helm in this new phase of GFWC. She has strong knowledge in our field technically and strategically, and is very well connected across the country as well as with the international community. 

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Canada’s Boreal icon at risk

(2014-12-11) Woodland caribou are in trouble throughout their range in Canada. “Thanks to new high-resolution global satellite data developed by Dr. Matthew Hansen at the University of Maryland, we can systematically and accurately determine the rate of forest change across all the range of Canada’s woodland caribou and pinpoint exactly where in the boreal forest these animals are most under threat.” 

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New satellite data analysis reveals areas of forest loss in the Y2Y Region

(2014-11-12) “The good news is that the entire area of Y2Y incurred a net forest loss of 2.4% during this period, an amount substantially less than for Canada as a whole,” said Peter Lee, Executive Director of Global Forest Watch Canada. “The bad news is that there are substantial regional differences between the North, Central and South zones of Y2Y, with the Central zone exhibiting significantly more net forest loss during the 2000 to 2012 period.”
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Tar Sands Threaten World’s Largest Boreal Forest (GFW Blog Post)

(2014-07-15)  "Canada’s boreal forest is one of Earth’s major ecological treasures. Yet the region’s forests are under threat from logging, hydrodams and mining. Satellite data reveals a major new threat to Canada’s boreal forests—tar sands development." Read the GFW blog post here.
 
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The State of Alberta's Forests - With a Focus on the Eastern Slopes

(2014-06-26) New Global Forest Watch satellite data reveals extensive forest loss in Alberta’s Eastern Slopes during the period 2000-2012. 6.8% of the forests in the Eastern Slopes were lost between 2000 and 2013 due to industrialization. This amount of loss is more than double that of the average throughout Canada’s forests and is also significantly greater than in Alberta’s tar sands region.

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Putting People on the Map: the Land Tenure Data Challenge and Global Forest Watch (GFW Blog Post)

(10-04-2014) "By incorporating land tenure information, Global Forest Watch will be among the first global tools that enable stakeholders to better understand who to hold accountable for forest loss, and who to recognize and reward for forest protection. However, collecting geospatial data on local land rights is challenging for several reasons." Read the GFW blog post here.

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5 Overlooked Deforestation Hotspots: Boreal Forests Are Cleared for Tar Sands Development (GFW Blog Post)

(21-03-2014) The World Resources Institute’s new Global Forest Watch initiative identifies 5 overlooked deforestation hotspots, one which is Canada's Tar Sands region. It includes an animation sequence of a portion of the tar sands region that shows forest loss annually from 2000 to 2012. The other forest global hotspots are in Paraguay, Malaysia, Ivory Coast, and the Atlanta suburbs in the United States. Click here to read the blog post.

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Industrial Concessions Cover Over One Quarter of Canada

(2014-02-27) “Concessions show the locations where companies consider resources to have an economic value. Now we have a national portrait of where these interests are across Canada,” said Ryan Cheng, lead author of the bulletin. “Granting industrial concessions can result in conflicting land uses when there are different visions for a landscape.”

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