GFWC’s Executive Director Wynet Smith to participate in Homeward Bound, an expedition to unite Women in Science

(20-10-2015) Homeward Bound is a state-of-the-art leadership and strategic program for women in science from around the globe, a once-in-a-lifetime journey to Antarctica, and a new future for our planet. It is the start of a 10-year outreach initiative to build a 1,000-strong global collaboration of women in science, who have had the same experience at sea together, focusing on the leadership and planning required to contribute to the recognition of our planet as home.

Global Forest Watch Canada’s (GFWC’s) Executive Director, Wynet Smith, is one of 78 remarkable female leaders in science from around the world who will together work on a range of projects throughout 2016, culminating in the 20 day trip to Antarctica to cement the ideas into real time actionable plans. Twelve people in all will deliver program content to change the lives of the women on board the expedition.

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Summary of IFL Field Work in Southcentral Newfoundland (GFW story post)

2015-09-18 GFWC's ED Wynet Smith visited Newfoundland and Labrador to verify our intact forest landscape mapping results there this summer. See a short summary of her trip and findings on the GFW crowdsourced stories site.

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Wynet's Route

(2015-07-13) GFWC's Executive Director, Wynet Smith, is leaving July 14 for a 5 week, 6,000+ km road trip to visit field sites from our latest mapping work. She will be exploring beautiful forest landscapes, especially examples of intact forest landscapes over 50,000 hectares, and verifying sites of mapped disturbance from our analysis of satellite imagery. Stay tuned over the next five weeks for regular updates.

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Forest change in Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest compared to its broader ecoregion in British Columbia

(2015/03/16) The Great Bear Rainforest is the name coined by environmental groups in the mid-1990s to refer to this remote region of temperate rain forest on the British Columbia Coast between Vancouver Island and Southeast Alaska. It is one of the largest remaining tracts of unspoiled temperate coastal rainforest left in the world. The Great Bear Rainforest is the subject of our most recent "hotspot" analysis using the new, high-resolution Hansen forest change dataset. See the summary on the international GFW website: http://www.globalforestwatch.org/stories/185

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Rates of Forest change in the Northern Appalachian/Acadian region of North America

(2015-03-11) The latest in our forest “hotspot” monitoring analyses using the new, high resolution Hansen forest change global dataset. The Northern Appalachian/Acadian region (see map) is a critically important ecological area in North America and recent studies have demonstrated that it is a region with tremendous opportunities for achieving large conservation goals. Follow this link to the summary of our analysis on the international GFW website: http://www.globalforestwatch.org/stories/180

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Announcing GFWC's New Executive Director: Wynet Smith

(2015-01-05) Global Forest Watch Canada is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Wynet Smith as our new Executive Director. Peter Lee, the previous Executive Director, will continue to be involved with GFWC on a part-time basis for a time.
 
GFWC is excited to have Wynet, with her breadth and depth of experience, take over the helm in this new phase of GFWC. She has strong knowledge in our field technically and strategically, and is very well connected across the country as well as with the international community. 

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Canada’s Boreal icon at risk

(2014-12-11) Woodland caribou are in trouble throughout their range in Canada. “Thanks to new high-resolution global satellite data developed by Dr. Matthew Hansen at the University of Maryland, we can systematically and accurately determine the rate of forest change across all the range of Canada’s woodland caribou and pinpoint exactly where in the boreal forest these animals are most under threat.” 

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Canada’s Boreal icon at risk: a ranking of the most threatened herd ranges of woodland caribou

(2014-12-11) Woodland caribou numbers are dropping because of habitat loss and high levels of predation by wolves, the result of vast changes in their herd ranges from a variety of development pressures. Now, thanks to a new study, we can for the first time systematically and accurately determine the rate of landscape change across all the range of woodland caribou and pin point where in the boreal forest these animals are most under threat. Our analysis clearly indicates the threat to boreal caribou is highest in Alberta.

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New satellite data analysis reveals areas of forest loss in the Y2Y Region

(2014-11-12) “The good news is that the entire area of Y2Y incurred a net forest loss of 2.4% during this period, an amount substantially less than for Canada as a whole,” said Peter Lee, Executive Director of Global Forest Watch Canada. “The bad news is that there are substantial regional differences between the North, Central and South zones of Y2Y, with the Central zone exhibiting significantly more net forest loss during the 2000 to 2012 period.”
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Forest Monitoring from Satellites in the Yellowstone to Yukon (Y2Y) Region

(2014-11-12) For the Y2Y region, Global Forest Watch Canada conducted a “first-look” analysis of forest extent and forest change, both loss and gain, for the period 2000-2012. We performed this analysis for three reasons: (1) to demonstrate the utility of powerful, new, freely-available satellite-based technologies; (2) to begin monitoring the key forest ecosystems of the Y2Y region, an area that is the focus of one of the planet's leading conservation initiatives; (3) to contribute to strategic discussions regarding where to focus conservation energies and resources for the forests of the Y2Y region.

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