Human Access of Canada’s Landscapes

 (2014-01-09)  Industrial and other human activity is fracturing Canada’s southern and western landscapes, according to this new bulletin (and accompanying dataset) by Global Forest Watch Canada. Summary information is provided for the amount of human access in each of Canada’s 13 jurisdictions and 15 ecozones.

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Canada Access 2010

(2014-01-09) Access is human-caused alteration of habitat and landscapes resulting in spatial separation of habitat and landscape units from a previous state of greater continuity. Major human access results in habitat fragmentation which is often a cause of species becoming threatened or endangered. This dataset provides an overall picture of the extent of human access in Canada.

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Report voices community concerns over development in Peace Region

(2013-12-09) “Oil and gas development, logging, mines, large dams and other industrial infrastructure are having an alarming impact on natural areas and wildlife habitat in the booming Peace Region of northeastern British Columbia.”

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Passages from the Peace: Community Reflections on BC's Changing Peace Region

(2013-12-09) Industrial activity is fracturing Northeastern B.C. on a scale unparalleled in Canada, according to this report by Global Forest Watch Canada and the David Suzuki Foundation. The report gives voice to concerns raised by First Nations and farming communities about the alarming pace of industrial development in the Peace Region.

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Canada’s intact forests suffer dramatic declines in Canada’s woodland caribou ranges and especially in Alberta

(2013-12-05) “We updated the data from satellite imagery to map what remains of Canada’s intact forest landscapes. Although there were some methodology changes from our previous version dated approximately 2001, the results show an overall steady decline in Canada’s intact forest landscapes, with some areas dramatically declining.” 
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Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes: Partial Update to 2010 and Three Overviews

(2013-12-05) This bulletin accompanies a revision to Global Forest Watch Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes dataset in which we updated the extent of IFLs in Alberta forest ecozones and Canada's woodland caribou boreal population herd ranges to circa 2010.

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Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes: Partial Update to 2010

(2013-12-05) This revision to Global Forest Watch Canada's Intact Forest Landscapes dataset updates the extent of IFLs in Alberta forest ecozones and Canada's woodland caribou boreal population herd ranges to circa 2010. 

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Global Forest Watch: Conserving Assets, Creating Legacies (Peter Lee at TEDx Nairobi)

(2013-11) GFWC's Executive Director talks about the Global Forest Watch (GFW) network: a partnership that aims to provide the most current, reliable, and actionable information about what is happening in forests worldwide. GFW unites satellite technology and human networks to show where and how forests are changing, who is using them, and how we can sustain them for future generations. View Peter's TEDx Talk on YouTube

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New Study Demonstrates Alberta Failing to Enforce Environmental Legislation

(2013-07-23) “The Alberta government’s disclosure process fails to deliver timely, accurate, error-free, and complete information. Procedures used to store and retrieve information from their database are dysfunctional. Because of the incomplete and error-filled data disclosed by government, the calculated incident rates should be viewed as minima of the true rates.” 
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Environmental Incidents in Northeastern Alberta’s Bitumen Sands Region, 1996-2012

(2013-07-23) This new study, authored by Dr. Kevin Timoney and Peter Lee, found that environmental violations in Alberta's bitumen sands region are frequent, enforcement is rare, record keeping is dysfunctional, and there is a chronic failure to disclose important environmental incident information to the public. 

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