protected areas

Bulletins 2 & 3. Linear Disturbance in the Castle and Implications for Grizzly Bear and Trout

(2016-09-20) The second and third bulletins in this series on disturbance issues in the Castle Wilderness examine the length of linear disturbances and their density in the newly proposed parks. There was a total of 1,823 km of linear features (e.g. roads, trails, and transmission lines). The density of linear disturbances in the provincial park was 3.5 km/km2, while in the wildland provincial park it was just over 1 km/km2. Thresholds described in the scientific literature to maintain core habitat for grizzly bears are 0.6 km/km2 and 0.69 km/km2 for bull trout.  The third bulletin details findings of analyses regarding the density of disturbances in relation to grizzly bear habitat, as well as westslope cutthroat and trout habitat.

Menu categories: 

Linear Disturbances in the Alberta Castle (2012)

(2016-09-20) Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) mapped linear disturbances in the Alberta Castle using ancillary data sources and air photographs from the summer of 2012, and then refined the dataset to categorize roads. This dataset was used in GFWC's analyses of the extent of linear disturbance and its impact on species at risk in Alberta's Castle region. The methodology used to create this data can be found in Bulletin 2.

Menu categories: 

Human Footprint in Alberta’s Newest Proposed Parks Already an Issue

(2016-09-20) “Our analysis shows the extent of linear disturbances in the Castle is already too high to maintain or enhance ecological integrity, particularly in the proposed provincial park,” said Wynet Smith, Executive Director of GFWC. “Much of the linear disturbances need to be removed and rehabilitated if the Castle is to meet its ecological objectives of water security and habitat for species at risk.” 

Menu categories: 

New Analysis Shows Proposed Castle Protected Areas Require Restoration

(2016-09-06) The proposed Castle protected area has been subject to fragmentation due to its long history of human use. However, it has the potential to protect some of the last remaining intact forest landscape fragments in the Southern Alberta foothills. As per GFWC’s results (which are summarized in its first bulletin on the issue), Executive Director Wynet Smith notes: “if we are truly to protect one of the greatest water sources and some of the most diverse habitat in Southern Alberta, the Government needs to actively restore this landscape.”  

Menu categories: 

Bulletin 1. Anthropogenic Disturbance and Intactness in the Castle

(2016-09-06) -  This is GFWC's first bulletin in a special series on the Castle Wilderness, which is currently proposed for protection. As input to the management planning process for the new protected areas, GFWC has conducted analysis to update disturbance and intactness information for this important ecological region. This first bulletin looks specifically at fragmentation in the area - and provides some analysis of the intact forest landscape fragments (IFLFs) that remain. 


Menu categories: 

New satellite data analysis reveals areas of forest loss in the Y2Y Region

(2014-11-12) “The good news is that the entire area of Y2Y incurred a net forest loss of 2.4% during this period, an amount substantially less than for Canada as a whole,” said Peter Lee, Executive Director of Global Forest Watch Canada. “The bad news is that there are substantial regional differences between the North, Central and South zones of Y2Y, with the Central zone exhibiting significantly more net forest loss during the 2000 to 2012 period.”
Menu categories: 

Forest Monitoring from Satellites in the Yellowstone to Yukon (Y2Y) Region

(2014-11-12) For the Y2Y region, Global Forest Watch Canada conducted a “first-look” analysis of forest extent and forest change, both loss and gain, for the period 2000-2012. We performed this analysis for three reasons: (1) to demonstrate the utility of powerful, new, freely-available satellite-based technologies; (2) to begin monitoring the key forest ecosystems of the Y2Y region, an area that is the focus of one of the planet's leading conservation initiatives; (3) to contribute to strategic discussions regarding where to focus conservation energies and resources for the forests of the Y2Y region.

Menu categories: 

Proposed new protected areas in Nova Scotia will help protect the endangered Acadian forests of North America

(2013-05-01) The proposed new protected areas currently being examined by the Nova Scotia government would conserve an additional 124,000 hectares of large intact forests, raising the overall level of protection to about 46% of all remaining large intact forests in the province. 

Menu categories: 

Nova Scotia's Proposed Protected Areas: How well do they capture large intact forest landscapes?

(2013-05-01) This bulletin was prepared by Global Forest Watch Canada in order to assess the amount of intact forest landscapes captured in the proposed protected areas announced by Nova Scotia's Department of Environment in February 2013.

Menu categories: 

Mapping Disturbances and Restoration-Protection Opportunities for Woodland Caribou within the James Bay Region of Northern Québec

(2011-12-05) This study was conducted because the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) expressed concerns about the potential devastating effects of industrial developments on woodland caribou within their traditional territory (in the James Bay region of northern Québec). The first report finds that with the current increasing rate of industrial disturbances in combination with forest fires, the prospect of these caribou supporting self-sustaining local populations in the near future appears to be declining rapidly. The second report maps restoration-protection opportunities for the caribou. 

At the International Society of Conservation Biology Conference in Auckland, New Zealand, in December 2011, representatives from the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) in Québec, Canada presented on the dramatic scientific evidence produced by Global Forest Watch Canada in these reports.

Menu categories: 

Pages