species at risk

Industrial developments threatening Canada's woodland caribou

Caribou(2012-01-10) Global Forest Watch Canada publishes new study confirming Environment Canada's “secret” concerns regarding threatened species in Alberta's oil sands region.

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Canada’s woodland caribou: Industrial disturbances in their ranges and implications for their survival

(2012-01-10) This bulletin contains evidence of the extent to which industrial developments are threatening woodland caribou (boreal population) in Canada's jurisdictions, especially in Alberta's oil sands region. This bulletin is part of a series by Global Forest Watch Canada to address the geographic distribution and key environmental impacts of Canada's energy sectors.

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Mapping Disturbances and Restoration-Protection Opportunities for Woodland Caribou within the James Bay Region of Northern Québec

(2011-12-05) This study was conducted because the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) expressed concerns about the potential devastating effects of industrial developments on woodland caribou within their traditional territory (in the James Bay region of northern Québec). The first report finds that with the current increasing rate of industrial disturbances in combination with forest fires, the prospect of these caribou supporting self-sustaining local populations in the near future appears to be declining rapidly. The second report maps restoration-protection opportunities for the caribou. 

At the International Society of Conservation Biology Conference in Auckland, New Zealand, in December 2011, representatives from the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) in Québec, Canada presented on the dramatic scientific evidence produced by Global Forest Watch Canada in these reports.

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Conservation-type areas in the Draft Lower Athabasca Regional Plan, Alberta: Implications for whooping crane and woodland caribou

(2011-09-22) The Alberta Government's recently announced Draft Lower Athabasca Regional Plan 2011-2021 allocates much more area to oil sands leases than to conservation areas for whooping cranes and woodland caribou, according to this Global Forest Watch Canada report.

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Migration of whooping cranes (Grus americana) through Alberta’s bitumen sands region

(2011-07-11) This report maps historical records of whooping crane flight paths and landing points in relation to Alberta's bitumen (oil) sands region. Whooping cranes have regularly flown over and landed within Alberta's oil sands region. Their migration route intersects with areas leased to and developed by oil sands companies, including the surface mineable area and its associated facilities, mine pits and tailings ponds. Several factors present in the oil sands region, including exposure to tailings ponds, poses a threat to the survival and recovery of the Canadian wild whooping crane population.

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Anthropogenic and Fire Disturbances in Woodland Caribou Herd Ranges in the Lower Athabasca Regional Plan Area, Alberta

(2011-06-21) This satellite-based analysis of industrial disturbances within threatened woodland caribou herds in the area of the Lower Athabasca Regional Plan documents that the prospects of these herds supporting self-sustaining populations in the near future appear to be declining rapidly due primarily to oil sands developments.

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Castle Area Forest Land Use Zone: Linear Disturbances, Access Densities and Grizzly Bear Habitat Security Areas

(2011-03-09) This report examines linear disturbances in the Castle Area Forest Land Use Zone of southwestern Alberta and analyzes these disturbances for: their use by motorized vehicles; the Government of Alberta's management and policy intentions compared to actual use by motorized vehicles, and; their potential impact on key grizzly bear areas.

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Environmental Impacts of the Tar Sands Industry in Northeastern Alberta: A Database

(2010-07-30) Greenpeace, Sierra Club Prairie, Keepers of the Athabasca and Global Forest Watch Canada together released databases compiled by prominent scientist Dr. Kevin Timoney, one with more than 6,500 incidents, regarding tar sands operations that raise serious concerns about how companies are allowed to operate in this province by the Alberta government.

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The Last Great Intact Forest Landscapes of Canada: Atlas of Alberta (Parts I & II)

(2009-04-02) This 2-part atlas was published in the hope that it will assist Albertans in their efforts to sustainably manage their important forest legacy; its production was triggered by the Alberta Government's release of Alberta's Land-use Framework in December 2008. The atlas reveals a dramatic reduction in large blocks of Alberta's natural boreal forest landscapes due to the expansion of industrial activities in recent decades. Part I of the atlas provides context and maps of Alberta's intact forest landscapes; Part II focuses on the threats to these forests.

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Recent Anthropogenic Changes within the Boreal Forests of Ontario and Their Potential Impacts on Woodland Caribou

(2007-03-27) This stage of GFWC's "Where's the Best of What's Left?" project involved identifying all disturbances to Ontario's Boreal that were caused by industry in the 1990s and early 2000s. The potential impacts of these disturbances on woodland caribou habitat were also considered in this analysis.

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